About Touching Strangers: Cincinnati

For FotoFocus 2014, ArtWorks partnered with Cincinnati Metro and invited renowned photographer Richard Renaldi to produce a unique extension of his existing project “Touching Strangers” in Cincinnati. In this project, Renaldi invites complete strangers to come together and pose, intimately, in ways that people are usually taught to reserve for their close friends, a real couple, or family. Renaldi creates spontaneous and fleeting relationships between strangers for the camera, often pushing his subjects beyond their comfort levels. These relationships may only last for the moment the shutter is released, but the resulting photographs are moving and provocative, and raise profound questions about the possibilities for positive human connection in a diverse society.

ArtWorks hired four youth Apprentices and two local professional photographers to aid Renaldi in the project execution and produce Touching Strangers portraits independently as well. The photographs will be housed in 60 bus shelters across the City of Cincinnati, 400 transit cards inside Metro buses, and pictured one image will be turned in to a vinyl bus wrap for six months. Click here to view a map of the shelter locations featuring this series.  [nggallery id=26]

About Touching Strangers

Since 2007, Richard Renaldi has been working on a series of photographs that involve approaching and asking complete strangers to physically interact while posing together for a portrait. Working on the street with a large format 8-by-10-inch view camera, Renaldi encounters the subjects for his photographs in towns and cities all over the United States. He pairs them up and invites them to pose together, intimately, in ways that people are usually taught to reserve for their close friends and loved ones.   Renaldi creates spontaneous and fleeting relationships between strangers for the camera, often pushing his subjects beyond their comfort levels. These relationships may only last for the moment the shutter is released, but the resulting photographs are moving and provocative, and raise profound questions about the possibilities for positive human connection in a diverse society.

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